Catalina 22 – Keel repairs needed – Pivot hole

Today is another post about the keel.  This time I’m posting pictures so a friend can help me find someone to fix it, preferably without spending an arm and a leg.

Here is a long view of the keel:

Long view of keel

 

And here is where the keel winch cable is attached.  I think it looks like it’s in pretty good shape.  When I yank on it it feels completely solid.

Keel winch cable attachment point

Keel winch cable attachment point

Keel winch cable attachment point

Keel winch cable attachment point

Keel winch cable attachment point

Keel winch cable attachment point

Next is the pivot hole.  I have rulers here to help show the size.

Keel pivot pin hole

Keel pivot pin hole

Here is a close up view:

Closeup of keel pivot pin hol

Closeup of keel pivot pin hol

Here I have put the pivot pin in to show how much of the keel is worn away.

Keel pivot hole with pin

Keel pivot hole with pin

Keel pivot hole with pin - closeup

Keel pivot hole with pin – closeup

 

Catalina Direct sold me a bushing to use too.  It doesn’t fit in the hole so I guess we’ll have to make the hole bigger.

pivot pin bushing

pivot pin bushing

 

pivot pin bushing

pivot pin bushing

 

pivot pin bushing

pivot pin bushing

So $tingy Sailor is planning on epoxying his keel pin in.  Should I do that, or epoxy the bushing and then let the keel pin slide inside the bushing?  It would make it easier to replace the pin in my annual maintenance check if the pin is not epoxied.  Which will wear first, the brass pin or the steel bushing?  Should I just epoxy it (bushing or pin) in, or actually try to build that hole back up with metal?  Questions, questions… anybody out there have answers?

Catalina 22 fiberglass repairs needed – Keel weldments and torn cleat damage

As you all know, since I have almost no fiberglass experience, I’m hesitant to jump into the repair by myself.  Fortunately, I’ve had an offer of help to get the weldments fiberglassed, so with some luck I’ll get the project finally moving.  I’ve already posted pictures of removing the weldments, but these new pics have rulers in them so give an idea of the size of the repairs needed.

Here you see where I’ve cut into the sole of the cabin to get access to two of the four weldments.  The other two were accessed by going through the dinette seat and don’t show in the cabin.  Above the 2″ mark on the ruler there is a dark rectangle with a darker round hole in it.   The post of the weldments will be inserted into the hole with the backing plate sitting flush into the rectangle left from the old weldments.  The horizontal dark marks above the rectangle are places where I cut through to the bottom of the boat in the process of cutting out the old weldments.  The side fiberglass is VERY thin there. (Although it won’t be when the weldments are glassed back in.)

Starboard keel weldments 1

The photo below shows another view of the starboard weldment, this time showing that the depth of the cut was about 1 and a half inches;

starboard weldments - 2

 

Below is a view of the port weldment cutout from below.  You can see a much bigger cut through.  This was the first weldment I cut out, before I realized what was happening, and thus was the biggest cut through.  Even though I knew what was happening, there really isn’t much room there.  Out of the four weldments I cut out, only 1 came out without cutting all the way through the hull.

port weldment from under the boat

Below is a picture of the same area, just from farther away.

Weldment location from below

And here is how the keel will be attached to the boat.  These are things are solid and heavy!  But then again, they have to hold a 550 lb keel on.

Keel hinge pin

 

The other fiberglass repair that is needed is to repair where a cleat was ripped out.  Probably small repair, but still outside my experience level.  This is on the top of the port gunwale, near the stern.

Ripped cleat