Hole in my boat

At long last, there are finally holes in my boat!  And that’s a good thing.

I suspected my sunfish is heavy due to the interior flotation being saturated with water. I’ve been needing to create some ventilation so begin the reverse osmosis process and evaporate the water.

I got a 4″ port from West Marine this past summer, but never really had a place to work on the boat.  Now that I have a garage and the sunfish is up on sawhorses, the only thing stopping me was the bazillion other house rehab projects on the “do list”

Here is the crew ready to get to work. We started on the forward hole. We drew a centerline between the daggerboard slot and the peak of the splash guard. Then marked the outline for the port.

The crew ready to get to work

The crew ready to get to work

I drilled a pilot hole to make room for the jigsaw blade. I drilled right next to the edge, but there was a little bit of splintering. I recommend being inside the circle a bit to start.

Drilling a pilot holle

Drilling a pilot holle

Next was cutting the hole with the jigsaw. It went very smoothly, except for the jigsaw blade falling out and down into the boat insides. Luckily I had another. Not sure why it came out. The set screw was securely fastened.  I retrieved the blade once the hole was cut.

Cutting the forward ventilation hole

Cutting the forward ventilation hole

Here I am cutting the hole near the stern.

Cutting hole near stern

Cutting hole near stern

Here are the pieces that were cut out. I cut through a piece of the flotation foam in the back. It was soaking wet! Saturation theory was correct!

Cutouts

Cutouts

Inside doesn’t look that bad. I thought it would be real moldy. The foam to either side was wet to the touch.

inside look

inside look

I left the light inside to heat it up a bit, and put a fan blowing front to back. The foam that I can reach at the back already feels dry. However, I suspect the bigger blocks of foam will take a lot of drying out.

Here is what it looks like now.  You can see the rear hole through the wire shelving.  That is a small black house fan on top of the forward hole.  It’s blowing pretty fast, but it is the lowest speed fan I have to use.

Drying out

Drying out

That is “Little Red” the riding lawnmower in the bottom right. His starter is not working at the moment.

That’s also the pegboard wall going up behind the boat.  Ran out of material last night due to a slight miscalculation.  Heading back to home depot today to get more stuff to finish.

No shortage of rehab projects around here.

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Roofing Rehab

This isn’t technically a CapnRehab job, but the roof on the Rehab homestead has been replaced.  We planned it as part of the purchase, and a good thing too!  Our first soaking rain here showed us several spots with continuous drips.  The worst leak was in Rehab Central!  Yep, dripping right in the garage right next to the boat!

Here are some action shots.   Stripping the old roof off. The guy on the left is sealing up the chimney (a previous source of leaks).  The guy on the right is taking off the shingles, the second guy from right is picking them up, the third guy is tossing them over his shoulder…

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then he walks over to the other side of the house, down this 30 foot, 3 foot wide board 10 feet in the air and tosses the shingles in the truck.  Can’t be scared of heights on this job!

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Sorry this next pic is blurry.  It’s the owner’s truck.  On the side it says “Owner on site”.  And there always was one of the two brothers here when the crew was working.

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They started in the front and worked their way to the back.  They never tossed anything on the ground and they were zealous about picking up anything that did drop and cleaning up any mess they made.  The second to the last day they worked from sunup to sundown trying to beat some bad weather that was coming.  (What, bad weather here?)

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Finished…Very nicely done.  These guys were top notch.

The best part is I didn’t fall off the roof because I didn’t have to go up there!

Propane Solved!

The propane saga has come to a happy ending. As you all know from the last post Propane Rehab – or why not to rent your tank, I bought a foreclosed house with a propane tank buried in the yard. The company that owned the tank said I had to rent it from them and buy my propane at whatever price they felt like selling it to me. They couldn’t quite understand me when I told them no.

What I did was ask to speak to the manager. I gave him a choice. Either sell it to me at a reasonable price, or come dig it out of my yard.  After some hemming and hawing, he agreed to sell it to me for $750.  It would have cost me three times that to get a new one, so although I think I could have done a little better – I took the deal.

Now I needed propane.  The company had tried to sock it to me at $2.99/gal because I was renting their tank and had no other choice.  That left me feeling somewhat hostile to them because it was about $.75/gal more than another company had offered.  However, when he offered to fill my tank at $2.09/gal I went for it.  Since I got 400 gallons, this cost difference FOR 1 TANK, was $360.    That tank should last me about two months at the rate we used the last tank.  I’m guessing 3 tanks per season, or an overcharge of ($360*3 +$250) $1330 per year I just saved.  I can do a lot of boat rehab for $1330!

One more thing.  While calling around I found a company that offered to charge me $2.25/gal.   I thought that was good, but when I got the offer to fill at $2.09/gal  I talked to the $2.25 guy again and asked if he could do better. He called back later and said he could match the $2.09 price, but I had already gone ahead with the purchase.

Moral of the story – never rent your propane tank

Other moral of the story – Always ask if they can cut you a better deal.

Sorry, no pictures for you this time.  We’ll get back to our regularly scheduled rehab next time.

Propane Rehab – or why NOT to rent your propane tank

(Read this post, then read the next post for the followup solution to my problem)

We bought the house, but apparently the 500 Gallon propane tank buried in the ground survived the foreclosure and is still owned by the Propane company that rented it to the previous owners.  Note, there is no proof anywhere that they own it, they say it and it is so.

Here is the deal they offered us.  Rent their 10 year old tank for $250/year.  Pay $200 for inspection and setup.  Sign a lease that says:

  • they can increase the fees at any time
  • we can only buy propane from them
  • they charge pretty much whatever they want
  • they bring it whenever they want
  • they automatically renew the lease unless you cancel 30 days prior to term ending
  • you pay to remove the tank (dig up and haul off) if you cancel the lease

And they kicker is they are charging $0.75 PER GALLON higher than the competition.  So on a single 500 gallon tank, filled to 80% capacity, you buy 400 gals * $.75 – $300 PER TANK overcharge.  I’m guessing maybe 4 tanks over the winter.  Any 2nd grader with a calculator should be able to work out that this is a bad deal.

When I told them I didn’t like the deal, but I would buy the tank, the snooty receptionists said “We don’t sell our tanks”.

ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS go to the person that can make a decision.  I got through the to manager and he offered to sell it for $1500.  I said no way, half the price or he could come get it.  He said he had to talk to his manager.  I feel like I’m buying a car.  Grr, this company really steams me up!

By the way, a new tank costs $700 up in PA.  For a few hours of driving (about $100 in gas) I can go get one.  Of course you have to have it installed so we’ll see how much that is.  I have two appointments to get bids tomorrow.

All this is urgent, because we don’t have any heat at the moment.  Fortunately we’re warming up and the next freeze is not for a week.  I better have this handled by then or you know who will be in the dog house!

If we do have to get a new one, it will be an above ground tank.  500 gallon tanks look like this:

This cracks me up.  We could get a 1000 gallon tank and have a submarine in the back yard!

Mrs. CapnRehab said “NO”.

monday move in projects

Tonight after work I continued to make the place livable.  I finished off the guest restroom by installing the tp and towel racks.  Before:

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after:

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I really like this room and do my most important thinking and reading here.

Also worked on the office.  Before:

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after:

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I know none of this is boat rehab but I have to get it out of the way before I can even begin work on the sunfish.

appliance rehab

Not exactly rehab, but the new appliances were delivered saturday morning. Double oven, dishwasher & microwave. Should be a simple matter of removing the old ones… and dropping in the new ones, right? Not exactly. It took two full days, three trips to Home Depot and two trips to Lowes. The double oven was difficult, in part because it was so darned heavy. I finally hit on the idea of setting up my car ramps and shoving the thing right up them to get it in place.

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At one point I needed to get it back out to reposition the wiring, but it was stuck solid. I thought I was going to have to call the repairmen to finish the job. At that point I paused for a few minutes, thought about it, and then lifted the corner in just the right way to free it. For most of the weekend, the kitchen looked like this.

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but eventually I prevailed and it finally looked like this

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Mrs. CapnRehab was quite pleased with her functioning double oven and microwave.

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The next major rehab on the house is replacing all the locks. Wish me luck….

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