Catalina 22 – Keel repairs needed – Pivot hole

Today is another post about the keel.  This time I’m posting pictures so a friend can help me find someone to fix it, preferably without spending an arm and a leg.

Here is a long view of the keel:

Long view of keel

 

And here is where the keel winch cable is attached.  I think it looks like it’s in pretty good shape.  When I yank on it it feels completely solid.

Keel winch cable attachment point

Keel winch cable attachment point

Keel winch cable attachment point

Keel winch cable attachment point

Keel winch cable attachment point

Keel winch cable attachment point

Next is the pivot hole.  I have rulers here to help show the size.

Keel pivot pin hole

Keel pivot pin hole

Here is a close up view:

Closeup of keel pivot pin hol

Closeup of keel pivot pin hol

Here I have put the pivot pin in to show how much of the keel is worn away.

Keel pivot hole with pin

Keel pivot hole with pin

Keel pivot hole with pin - closeup

Keel pivot hole with pin – closeup

 

Catalina Direct sold me a bushing to use too.  It doesn’t fit in the hole so I guess we’ll have to make the hole bigger.

pivot pin bushing

pivot pin bushing

 

pivot pin bushing

pivot pin bushing

 

pivot pin bushing

pivot pin bushing

So $tingy Sailor is planning on epoxying his keel pin in.  Should I do that, or epoxy the bushing and then let the keel pin slide inside the bushing?  It would make it easier to replace the pin in my annual maintenance check if the pin is not epoxied.  Which will wear first, the brass pin or the steel bushing?  Should I just epoxy it (bushing or pin) in, or actually try to build that hole back up with metal?  Questions, questions… anybody out there have answers?

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4 thoughts on “Catalina 22 – Keel repairs needed – Pivot hole

  1. Good pictures. They show how the keel must have been wearing out that hole for a long time. But I’ve seen worse. To the point where the slot wore completely out and the keel fell off!

    I’d suggest having the bushing welded in after sandblasting. Epoxy won’t be a strong enough bond with the length and weight of the keel constantly levering on the pin when you sail. Weld it in and you won’t have to worry. The trick will be making sure the bushing is perfectly perpendicular (or at least very close) to the keel centerline (in both directions) so it will hang plumb both when raised (to fit in the trunk without hitting the sides) and lowered.

    While they’re at it (I assume you won’t do the welding yourself), I’d have them build up around the eye bolt a bit without welding it in. It looks pretty corroded and more metal will be lost in sandblasting. The bolt hole is only 1-1/4″ deep. Better safe than sorry.

    Then, I’d suggest lubricating the pin annually and letting it turn in the sleeve and the hangers. That will spread the wear surface out over the full length of the pin (not just the center or the ends) and minimize wear. The brass will wear first and you can easily replace the pin if it gets too bad. The previous owner of our boat epoxied the pin into the cast iron, so I didn’t have a choice, but it works okay in my case although the keel hangs at a slight angle.

    That’s my .02 for what it’s worth. Hopefully, others with more experiences rebuilding the keel hole will contribute so you can make the best decision.

    • Thanks for the pointers. I’m going to go with sealing in the bushing and leaving the pin rotating freely. You’re right, I won’t be welding (but it’s on my list of things to learn) so I’ll have them fix the eye bolt too.

      I know it gets pretty cold up there. How do you heat your workspace? It’s cold enough here in Maryland that I have to do something.

      • We’re having an unusually mild winter here in eastern WA this year. We had a few weeks of single-digit temps earlier but it’s a brown Christmas this year and temps are in the 20’s this morning.

        I’m blessed to have three places to work on our boat. She’s normally parked in our three story barn. It’s great to keep her dry in winter and shaded in summer. It makes it easier to work on her year-round but it’s not heated.

        After I dropped the keel, I moved it into the larger bay of my 1,300 sq. ft. workshop/garage. We heat our home with two wood pellet fireplace inserts, one downstairs and one upstairs. I have a third free-standing stove in this bay of the workshop so I can use the same fuel. I’ll do most of the keel work there. Forest products are plentiful and economical here in the northwest.

        Smaller projects I work on in the center bay of the workshop where my woodworking and other power tools are set up. I have a small wall-mounted ventless propane heater that takes up less space and heats that area. I have a ceiling-mounted box fan that filters and circulates the air.

      • Wow, thanks for the detailed explanation. That sounds like a fantastic setup. I used to have access to a barn, but don’t anymore.

        All I have is my garage, but I think I will add a window mounted propane ventless heater. Have to get it warm in there before I can start slathering up any resin.

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