The second best day

They say the two best days in a boat owners life are the day he buys a boat, and the day he sells it.  I’ve done both and not felt that way, but this time I have to admit a bit of relief.

You may recall a few posts back in my “3 year anniversary” post where I outlined steps for success in getting some boat progress.  Step 1 was getting the Sunfish off my “to-do” list.  I’m happy to say the task is complete.  I posted the ad on Craigslist Sunday night, by Saturday at 11:30 am  I had a firm commitment by someone to come get it, and by 3 pm she was gone.  I suspect offering it for free may have had something to do with how fast she went, but at least she’s going to a good home.  Howard in Slaughter Beach, Delaware has a Sunfish fleet of about 20 boats and said that every year he fixes up a couple of Sunfish and gets someone new sailing in it.  I’m very happy about how that worked out.

Sunfish Departure

Since Mrs. G at Boca Ciega Yacht Club had been so nice to give me the Sunfish I do feel bad about not following through and finishing the job.  Unfortunately, work, sailing and the Catalina 22 have sort of taken over my priorities.  I am in a very different place when I got the boat originally, so sometimes you have to re-prioritize.  This is one of those times.

Next step in getting the Catalina 22 ready is to get those darn Keel weldments glassed in!  I was going to go the professional route, but this weekend at the West River Sailing Club annual meeting I got an offer of help!  So stay tuned, we’ll make progress there  – soon I hope.

Speaking of WRSC, here is a picture from the roof while I was at the fall cleanup day.  It sure is a beautiful place.

Fall cleanup day at WRSC - view from the roof

Fall cleanup day at WRSC – view from the roof

 

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Is it worth it to fix the sunfish?

After receiving the unwelcome and discouraging guidance from that well known west coast Catalina supplier that I should take the Catalina 22 to a boat yard to finish the keel weldment repair, I redirected my attention to the Sunfish I’ve carried around with me for the last 2 years.

This is what it looked like when I first saw it:

Being given a sunfish

First look at the Sunfish

Here is what it looked like recently when I took out the splash guard grommets:

Recent sunfish photo

Recent sunfish photo

I’ve been wavering back and forth about just repainting it as is, or removing the beat up trim first. It will cost around $100 to get replacement trim for it, so it’s not exactly a trivial matter. I decided to take the trim off carefully and see if I could maybe polish up the trim and reuse it. This was fine for the bow and starboard trim.  The rivets don’t actually go all the way through the trim.  They just go through the top layer and into the fiberglass.  First you drill out the center…

drill out the rivet

drill out the rivet

just…enough.. to get the top to pop off.

rivet drill out complete

rivet drill out complete

Starting at the end of the trim piece, I just pried the trim over the remaining rivet post and off it came.  Easy as pie.  It’s interesting to see that the original paint job was done before the trim was added.  Very nice Bicentennial stripe there – this is a 1976 Sunfish and the stripes match the old (rotted and useless but with pretty red white and blue colors) sail.

Old Bicentennial stripe

Old Bicentennial stripe

Once I got to the third and last piece on the port side it was a different story.  I broke a drill bit…. and another drill bit.  I noticed these rivets seemed to be bigger than the other ones.

Broke a drill bit

Broke a drill bit

And I was having trouble getting the trim off once the rivet was off.  It. Just. Would. Not. Come. Off!!!  Then I could see why.  It had been caulked in this spot.  Hmmmm….

It just won't come off!

looks like some kind of caulk

Then I saw that these rivets were all the way through the trim.  This boat has already been through a repair job.  I finally got  the last piece of trim off, but unfortunately, it was in about 6 pieces.  So much for reusing the trim.

Not reusing this trim for sure

Not reusing this trim for sure

And this lovely site in the picture below was revealed.  The top has separated from the bottom.
Here you can see there is caulk in the join that might be sealing it – and might not.

hull split

hull split

A little further aft it looks like the hull is fully separated.  In addition, there are quite a few spots around the hull flange that are in pretty bad shape.  Here is the view from the bottom.  Almost everywhere that had a large rivet (about 3 feet on the port aft quarter) it looks like this.

other damage

other damage

So.  I’m looking at:

$100 full trim replacement
$100 fiberglass supplies (epoxy, catalyst, cloth, rollers, etc.)
$100 complete sand, paint and gelcoat,
$250 replacement hardware and running gear,
$350 new sail.  (May be able to repair the one I have, but I doubt it)

At least $900 .  I just looked on craigslist and I can get a great looking one for $650.

What to do?

I’m discouraged.  I’m not making progress on either of my boat projects.  I don’t think I’m a very good CapnRehab.

Hole in my boat

At long last, there are finally holes in my boat!  And that’s a good thing.

I suspected my sunfish is heavy due to the interior flotation being saturated with water. I’ve been needing to create some ventilation so begin the reverse osmosis process and evaporate the water.

I got a 4″ port from West Marine this past summer, but never really had a place to work on the boat.  Now that I have a garage and the sunfish is up on sawhorses, the only thing stopping me was the bazillion other house rehab projects on the “do list”

Here is the crew ready to get to work. We started on the forward hole. We drew a centerline between the daggerboard slot and the peak of the splash guard. Then marked the outline for the port.

The crew ready to get to work

The crew ready to get to work

I drilled a pilot hole to make room for the jigsaw blade. I drilled right next to the edge, but there was a little bit of splintering. I recommend being inside the circle a bit to start.

Drilling a pilot holle

Drilling a pilot holle

Next was cutting the hole with the jigsaw. It went very smoothly, except for the jigsaw blade falling out and down into the boat insides. Luckily I had another. Not sure why it came out. The set screw was securely fastened.  I retrieved the blade once the hole was cut.

Cutting the forward ventilation hole

Cutting the forward ventilation hole

Here I am cutting the hole near the stern.

Cutting hole near stern

Cutting hole near stern

Here are the pieces that were cut out. I cut through a piece of the flotation foam in the back. It was soaking wet! Saturation theory was correct!

Cutouts

Cutouts

Inside doesn’t look that bad. I thought it would be real moldy. The foam to either side was wet to the touch.

inside look

inside look

I left the light inside to heat it up a bit, and put a fan blowing front to back. The foam that I can reach at the back already feels dry. However, I suspect the bigger blocks of foam will take a lot of drying out.

Here is what it looks like now.  You can see the rear hole through the wire shelving.  That is a small black house fan on top of the forward hole.  It’s blowing pretty fast, but it is the lowest speed fan I have to use.

Drying out

Drying out

That is “Little Red” the riding lawnmower in the bottom right. His starter is not working at the moment.

That’s also the pegboard wall going up behind the boat.  Ran out of material last night due to a slight miscalculation.  Heading back to home depot today to get more stuff to finish.

No shortage of rehab projects around here.

sunfish comes to the new house

The move to the new house is nearing completion.  All my stuff from storage  is now in the garage.

image

Today rehab junior and I brought the sunfish to the new house and put it on sawhorses.

image

My next boat task is to cut portals in the deck and get airflow through it to dry it out. Unfortunately there are tons of things to do on the house before I can even begin to do boat stuff.

I sure am excited to be in the new house.  After four years of moving around I am finally going to get my tools set up.

Visualization – part two

The fallout from Tropical Storm Debby is that we got a lot of trash being washed up on our beach.  I went out that saturday for my usual morning cup of coffee on the beach when to my dismay realized I was basically sitting in a garbage dump.   I was surrounded by all kinds of trash.  (Mostly plastic, more on that later)  I just couldn’t sit there and do nothing.  I decided to pick it up.

I wound up collecting a full garbage bag, and also a bunch of boards and even a plastic cooler lid. Then I got a gift in return.

Remember a while back when I had that post about visualization, and being specific?  Well it works.  It think it works in part because by keeping something visualized, you recognize opportunities when they appear.

As part of the sunfish rehab, I need to fix the trailer.  The trailer has two 2×6 boards  that support the hull once it’s on the trailer.  They are partly rotted and look kinda crappy, so they need to be replaced.   I haven’t wanted to go buy a board, in part because I’m cheap, and in part because the trailer isn’t high on the priority list yet.  But I’ve been thinking eventually I’ll need to get one.  Not anymore.

One of the things washed up on the beach is a 2×6 beam.  And it’s not even pressure treated.  It’s Trex!  Permanent.

Yay visualization!

Old and future trailer skids

Old and future trailer skids

Sunfish Trim redo

I found this link with directions on how to redo the trim on a sunfish.  I think I need to remove the trim in order to do a good job on repainting it.  Besides, It looks like it could use reconditioning anyway.  HOWEVER.  It says you need 6 to 7 pieces of 5 foot trim at $25 each.  I’m not sure I want to spend $175 bucks on just the trim.  But if I go to the trouble of redoing the paint and all the hardware, it’s going to look bad to have old trim on a new looking boat.  Now ordinarily I don’t care what things look like, especially if it’s for what other people think.  In this case, I’m going to be doing it for me, so in this case the final looks count.

Am I taking this too far?  Should I just sand off what gelcoat I need to, paint what I can reach, and go sailing?

There is a good chance that I’ll have this boat a long, long time.

Projected cost:

$175 – 7 lengths of trim
$ ?? – rivets
$ ?? – rivet tool

Sunfish mainsheet cleat question

I need to start getting the replacement parts for the sunfish.  This gives me a chance to redo some things with newer/better designs.  I’ve seen several different layouts for the mainsheet cleat.  Here is what I had before.  Notice it has a cleat right there on the swivel base.  I didn’t take a picture of it, but I think it also had a cleat (might have just been the kind you tie off) right below the swivel inside the cockpit, on the front center.  (You can see the two holes left over from it)

2012-06-02  Original equipment

2012-06-02 Original equipment

I saw this swivel ratchet on a pretty boat that was on craigslist. Notice that it has a cleat on either side of the cockpit and the ratchet that the mainsheet goes through is on a swivel.  The sunfish at BCYC have the same kind of ratchet.  I like the ratchet and think I’ll switch over, what about the cleats?

Alternate MainSheet Cleat Position

Alternate MainSheet Cleat Position

Which way is better?

I’m especially looking for input from My2Fish, but anyone else with an opinion is free to join in.